Evidence-Based Management

Myth-busting

Teamwork

Five questions about psychological safety, answered.

Although the concept of psychological safety has been around since the 1960s, it recently came storming into the mainstream when research by Google on high-performing teams hit the news. While Google’s research, which focused on 180 of its teams, is illuminating, this evidence summary highlights some of the findings from a new meta-analysis on the topic by Lance Frazier and colleagues (2017). They reviewed samples from 117 studies representing over 22,000 individuals and nearly 5,000 groups!
Specifically, we’ll review the answers to five important questions about psychological safety in light of these findings
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Teams going virtual: why focusing on trust matters

Have you ever worked in a virtual team? Collaborating with colleagues at distance is now very common, just look at the success of virtual team working tools such as Google Hangouts, Google Drive and more recently, Slack. Breuer, Hüffmeier and Hertel (2016) conducted a meta-analysis of 52 studies which investigated the role of trust in virtual teams. They pulled together results from 1,850 teams – that’s data from more than 12,000 people!
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Recruiting and Selection

Leadership

Managers… How Much Justice Is Enough?

In 2013, Colquitt et al. published a colossal meta-analysis pooling results from 413 scientific studies which investigated to what extent employee perceptions of justice in managerial behavior are associated with higher employee performance. The type of research studies included allows us to conclude if there is a positive relationship between perceptions of justice and performance.
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Learning & Development

Training that works (hint: motivation matters more than you think)

-Cognitive ability matters for training success, but motivation matters more!
-Motivation is likely to be higher when trainees believe in themselves (self-efficacy) and when they value the benefits that a training brings (valence).
-Training works when people learn, then apply what they learned to their job and their performance improves.
-Skill acquisition and self-efficacy will likely lead to training material being transferred to the job.
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Wellbeing

Mental Health is your business: Workplace Interventions that do good, and those that do harm

Key points To promote mental health, give employees more control over the scheduling of their own work and introduce programs to facilitate a healthy lifestyle, for example enabling employees to engage in physical activity Screen employees when appropriate; recommend and support Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and other effective interventions for those diagnosed with a mental health disorder
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Mental health is your business: The toxic job characteristics that risk our well-being

It is estimated that more than 3 in 10 employees will experience a mental health problem each year, with a staggering 80 million working days lost to anxiety and depression. These disorders are common yet devastating, and can make work a constant battle for employees. With such a widespread impact on employees across workplaces, identifying and addressing these risk factors is vital. What impact might they be having in your workplace?
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Interviews

Next Generation Performance Management: Interview with Alan Colquitt, Director of Global Assessment, Organizational Effectiveness, and Workforce Research at Eli Lilly.

Alan Colquitt is the Director of Global Assessment, Workforce Research, and Organizational Effectiveness at Eli Lilly and Company. He has spent over 30 years helping organizations implement scientifically sound and effective people and organizational practices.  He is the author of the recently published book “Next Generation Performance Management: The Triumph of Science over Myth and Superstition” and he has spoken tirelessly on how to transform performance management. Alan’s work and reputation led him to be named as one of the 100 top HR influencers of 2017 by Engagedly.
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Interview with Rob Briner, Scientific Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Management (CEBMa)

ob Briner is Professor of Organizational Psychology in the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary University of London. He is also very active in developing evidence-based practice in management, HR and organizational psychology. He was a founding member, Vice-Chair and now Scientific Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Management which, through its teaching, training and dissemination activities aims to help managers make better decisions by adopting the principles of evidence-based practice. Rob’s work in this area has led to him being named in 2016 the Most Influential HR Thinker by HR Magazine.
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